Canned Cream of Soup Replacement-From Scratch Cooking

By Melissa Norris | Pioneering Today

Nov 27

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving and there is going to be a whole lot of baking and cooking in America’s kitchens, if you haven’t started already. I made and froze all of my pie crusts (my great-grandmothers flaky pastry crust is amazing) ahead of time last week, so I only have to thaw them for an hour or two on the counter while I work on the rest of my meal. Anyone else love those little tricks that save you time later on?

Or if you only have one oven and no room for more pies, try my No Bake Pumpkin Cream Pie. It’s a cross between a cheesecake and a mousse, and I dare say, it’s better than regular pumpkin pie and no cooking time!

Another popular item on the Thanksgiving table is green bean casserole. Green beans are one of my favorite vegetables. Part of the reason is my grandparents brought their heirloom Tarheel green bean seed with them across the country in the 1940’s when they moved to Washington state. My family has faithfully saved the seed every year and it is the only green bean we eat. This year we canned 80 jars of the little green beauties.

I try to make sure that all of the food that graces our table is GMO free, organic, and home grown whenever possible. Kind of like the Amish… I used to use those cans of condensed soup without any thought. Until I started to investigate my food and what chemicals, pesticides, and GMO’s do to our bodies. 

Now I cringe when I see cans of condensed soup listed in recipes. They’re filled with GMO ingredients, soy, soy, and more soy, artificial food coloring, and canola oil to name a few of the not healthy ingredients.

Don’t panic if you’ve used them or can’t bear to not fix your favorite casseroles. I’ve got ya covered. Did you know how easy and quick it is to make the real deal? It only takes about ten minutes and your dish will be all the tastier for it, I promise.

Green bean casserole calls for cream of mushroom soup, so that’s the variation we’ll use today. One thing I like to do is make a double batch. You can freeze one half to use in later casseroles or to save time on busy nights.

I’m sharing my recipe over on Not Quite Amish Living so hop on over for the recipe!

 

 

 

 

 

About the Author

Melissa K. Norris inspires people's faith and pioneer roots with her books, podcast, and blog. Melissa lives with her husband and two children in their own little house in the big woods in the foothills of the North Cascade Mountains. When she's not wrangling chickens and cattle, you can find her stuffing Mason jars with homegrown food and playing with flour and sugar in the kitchen.

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