How to Make Rose Water Syrup

How To Make Rose Water Syrup – Ma Ingall’s Recipe

By Heather Harris | DIY Recipes & Tutorials

Aug 22

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How to Make Rose Water Syrup

Slightly sweet, delicious, and perfect for pancakes, waffles, or over desserts, this homemade rosewater syrup is so easy to make!

Did you know that many roses are edible? And, they make delicious treats, too!

This used to be a common place in pioneer and cottage kitchens, but in the span of a century, has almost been lost in modern kitchens. That my friends is a shame and people like you and me, we want to preserve these old timey traditions and recipes for things like rose water syrup and using our own gardens to make natural herbal remedies for our families.

Rose hips, often referred to as Rosa canina are the fruit of the thorny wild rose plant. They can range in colors from orange to purplish black. This particular species is the most commonly used, and  has a tart, crab apple like flavor.

They are picked in autumn or early winter, depending on location, and commonly used medicinally. Once you harvest them, you will want to dry thoroughly before using them. Discard any that are bruised, or already shriveled up. Avoid those that may have been sprayed with toxic chemicals. Rose hips are full of Vitamin C, and made into teas, jams, syrups, and even soups.

Other benefits of rose hips:

  • They may help control blood sugar levels. One study in the American Journal of Physiology, scientists found that a 20-week course of powdered rose hip helped prevent diabetes in mice fed a high-fat diet, in part by reducing the accumulation of fat cells in the liver.
  • Rose hips may help with digestive issues. A review from the University of Zaragoza in Spain, rose hip appeared to slow the contraction of the intestinal muscles nearly as effectively as the drug Lomotil (diphenoxylate) used to treat diarrhea.

Although rose hips are generally safe, if you are taking certain anti-anxiety or anti-depression drugs, speak to your health care professional before using them. Excessive use of rose hips may also cause nausea, headache, and in larger doses, can cause issues with sleep. 

We are going to make a nourishing rose water syrup using this delicious part of the plant.

Since having access to fresh rose hips isn’t easy for everyone, we are going to make this homemade rose syrup with dried rose hips. If you don’t have rose hips here’s a bag of organic dried rose hips. 

What kind of sweeteners can I use with this rose water syrup?

You can use granulated sugar, honey, or any sugar substitute you wish. However, the type of sugar you use may change the thickness of the syrup. Boiling the water and sugar can produce a thicker syrup over a sugar substitute like erythritol. Honey will need to be added after you infuse the rose hips to keep the heath properties of the honey. A combination of granulated sugar and honey will give you the most thick syrup, with the benefits of raw honey.

This recipe is based on and shared from Ma Ingall’s kitchen and the Little House Cookbook

How to Make Rose Water Syrup Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups water
  • 1 cup sweetener
  • 1 cup dried rose hips

Instructions:

  1. In a medium sized sauce pan, bring the water and sugar to a boil.
  2. Stir frequently to dissolve the sugar. Allow to boil for 3-4 minutes, until it begins to thicken.
  3. Add the rose hips, turn off the heat, and cover the pot.
  4. Allow the rose hips to infuse for 15 minutes. Strain and discard the used rose hips.
  5. If desired, return to the stove over medium heat to thicken more, stirring constantly.
  6. Store in a tightly covered jar in the fridge for up to 4 weeks.

 

What would you use this rosewater syrup on first?

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How To Make Rose Water Syrup

This rose water syrup is slightly sweet, high on flavor, and the perfect old-fashioned addition to both your cooking and natural herbal cabinet.

  • Author: Melissa Norris
  • Prep Time: 15
  • Cook Time: 4 min
  • Total Time: 19 minutes
  • Yield: 4 cups 1x
  • Method: stove top
Scale

Ingredients

  • 4 cups water
  • 1 cup sweetener
  • 1 cup dried rose hips

Instructions

  1. In a medium sized sauce pan, bring the water and sugar to a boil.
  2. Stir frequently to dissolve the sugar. Allow to boil for 3-4 minutes, until it begins to thicken.
  3. Add the rose hips, turn off the heat, and cover the pot.
  4. Allow the rose hips to infuse for 15 minutes. Strain and discard the used rose hips.
  5. If desired, return to the stove over medium heat to thicken more, stirring constantly.
  6. Store in a tightly covered jar in the fridge for up to 4 weeks.

Notes

You can use granulated sugar, honey, or any sugar substitute you wish. However, the type of sugar you use may change the thickness of the syrup. Boiling the water and sugar can produce a thicker syrup over a sugar substitute like erythritol. Honey will need to be added after you infuse the rose hips to keep the heath properties of the honey. A combination of granulated sugar and honey will give you the most thick syrup, with the benefits of raw honey.

Keywords: how to make rose water syrup, rose water syrup

Want more old-fashioned Ma Ingall’s recipes? How about recipes using rose water syrup? Then head over to this Old-fashioned Blueberry Pudding Recipe with Rosewater Sauce

Now you know how to make rose water syrup, have you ever had it before?

 

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About the Author

With over 20 years experience in the kitchen, Heather loves to create delicious, nutritious foods that her family will enjoy! Follow her adventures on easyketodishes.com or recipesfromthehomestead.com and see what's cooking!

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