Buckwheat Pancake Recipe from the 1920s

By Andrea Sabean | Recipes

Jun 24

This buckwheat pancake recipe is not your ordinary pancake, and there is nothing quite like a weekend morning breakfast of hot-off-the-griddle pancakes.

Especially when the batter can be made the night before, making these an overnight fermented pancake recipe. Score!Overnight Buckwheat Pancake Recipe from scratch

This heritage recipe was found among my great-grandmother’s recipes, in a cookbook released in 1921.

Unlike most modern buckwheat pancake recipes, this one incorporates yeast into the batter, which rises overnight and is cooked in the morning.

Disclosure: Some of the below links are affiliate links. Thank you kindly for your support.

Resources for Buckwheat Pancakes

Organic Buckwheat Flour– this flour is batch tested and certified gluten-free and organic

Molasses- a long time stand-by in old recipes and added health benefits with vitamins and minerals, compared to most sweeteners.

Love historical recipes like this, when food was made from scratch and with wholesome real ingredients? Grab our additional 4 Easy Frugal Recipes from the 1920’s below for free.

Batter can also be saved from the first batch and used for subsequent batches without adding more yeast, similar to a sourdough starter.

For those who may have allergies, these buckwheat pancakes are also gluten-free, egg-free, and refined-sugar free, although this was probably not even a consideration when the recipe was written!

Sweetened only with molasses, they are an enjoyable breakfast treat served with fruit, drizzled with maple syrup, or topped with yogurt.  Cooked pancakes also keep well in the fridge for a few days, and freeze well, too.  I also like them toasted and spread with peanut butter.

Overnight Buckwheat Pancakes

  •  2 cups buckwheat flour
  • 1/2 cup cornmeal
  • 2 1/4 tsp yeast
  • 2 cups warm water
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 Tbsp molasses, divided
  • 1 tsp baking soda

Beat first 6 ingredients (only using 1 Tablespoon of molasses) in large bowl until smooth.  Cover the bowl and leave overnight.

The next morning, stir in 1 tsp baking soda and another tbsp of molasses.

Cook on a greased pan – my cast iron frying pan does the best job with these pancakes.  Cook until bubbles form on the top, then flip and cook on the other side.

If desired, save 1 cup of batter, stored in the fridge, to start the next batch of pancakes.  The batter should keep up to 3 days in the fridge.  I give mine a quick shake or stir daily to keep it from separating.

To use the starter:

Pour the starter into a large bowl and add:

  • 2 cups buckwheat flour
  • 1/2 cup cornmeal
  • 2 cups warm water
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp molasses

Follow the steps above.

Buckwheat Pancake Recipe from the 1920s
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 2 cups buckwheat flour
  • ½ cup cornmeal
  • 2¼ tsp yeast
  • 2 cups warm water
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 Tbsp molasses, divided
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • USING EXISTING STARTER INGREDIENTS
  • 2 cups buckwheat flour
  • ½ cup cornmeal
  • 2 cups warm water
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp molasses
  • 1 tsp baking soda
Instructions
  1. Beat first 6 ingredients (only use 1 Tablespoon of molasses) in large bowl until smooth. Cover the bowl and leave overnight.
  2. The next morning, stir in 1 tsp baking soda and another tbsp of molasses.
  3. Cook on a greased pan - my cast iron frying pan does the best job with these pancakes. Cook until bubbles form on the top, then flip and cook on the other side.
  4. If desired, save 1 cup of batter, stored in the fridge, to start the next batch of pancakes. The batter should keep up to 3 days in the fridge. I give mine a quick shake or stir daily to keep it from separating.
  5. USING EXISTING STARTER INSTRUCTIONS
  6. Beat first 5 ingredients into saved starter until smooth. Cover the bowl and leave overnight.
  7. The next morning, stir in 1 tsp. baking soda.
  8. Follow the steps above for cooking.
 

That’s it!  Now you can enjoy this buckwheat pancake recipe all week long!

SaveSave

About the Author

Andrea is an artisan and teacher trying to live a handmade and homemade lifestyle with her husband in Eastern Canada. She is passionate about growing her own food, cooking healthy meals, using herbs for healing, nurturing creativity, and finding joy and blessings in the every-day moments of life. She writes about all of this, plus her adventures in sewing, crafting, and pattern design at http://www.artisaninthewoods.com/

(7) comments

Add Your Reply